Branding a Need

Giving them a reason to buy your product

Using market research can work to your advantage when trying to sell a product.

Look at how GoDaddy used the startling information about how only half of small businesses in the U.S. have websites. This bit of information (complete with quotes from the research firm that provided the information explaining the amount of potential business they’re losing) makes for a nice segue into pitching the sale of domain names.

A while back I talked about a press release from Somerset International who used frightening statistics about workplace violence to help push their security product.

Whether or not these particular campaigns have been effective for their respective companies is information that I don’t have unfortunately, but the marketing tactic is an interesting one regardless.

When you can show potential customers why they need your product with good concrete statistics, it seems that they would be more inclined to take the need (for the type of product you are selling) more seriously.

This tactic is a common one in press releases, but I think it can also work in articles, blog posts, conversations on social networks, and even advertisements potentially.

Branding the Need for Your Product

It’s almost like branding the need for your product rather than branding your product itself.  Like other branding, this can work on a subconscious level.

"Wow, workplace violence is a common problem. What would I do if a situation came up at my office?"

"They’re right, I am missing out on a lot of potential business from not having a web site…"

Of course the branding of your product should compliment the branding of the need.

When getting to the pitch of your product whether that be in the form of an ad, a press release, product page, etc, be sure to explain how this product is going to eliminate that need.

No Market Research to be Found

In some industries, market research may be a little harder to come across, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still brand a "need".

Let’s say you sell chocolate. On the surface, it may appear that nobody "needs" chocolate. There probably isn’t any market research out there proving that chocolate is making people live longer (or maybe there is…if so, i recommend using that data in a marketing campaign), but you can still brand the "need" to satisfy your sweet tooth. Obviously this isn’t a true human need, but I think you get my point.

The Point

If you don’t (get my point), it is basically this: Make people see why they need your product, and if you convince them that the need is there, show them why your product is the solution to that need.

I realize that this isn’t groundbreaking advice, but it is perhaps a concept that sometimes gets lost in the shuffle.

What do you think? Respond.

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