What Most Small Businesses Are Doing Wrong on Social Media (And 5 Tips For Success)

Most try to take advantage of trends, but few reap the rewards

I’m taking some vacation time this week and I’m actually going to stand waist deep in the Columbia River in Oregon and cast for Trout. (Don’t worry I won’t hurt any I’m strictly a catch and release kind of guy.)  While I am away, I have a great lineup of guest bloggers filling my shoes.  This post is brought to you from Dave Kerpen.

Dave Kerpen is the CEO of Likeable, a social media agency that has worked with more than 200 leading brands, including Verizon and Neutrogena. He is author of The New York Times best seller Likeable Social Media. Dave recently launched Likeable Community College and Likeable Local.

Over 900 million people in the world are on Facebook, including over 180 million Americans, or 1 in 2 adults. Twitter recently surpassed 300 million accounts. Small business owners are trying to take advantage of these trends, but few are fully reaping the rewards. 

For most business owners, the temptation is to use social networks to promote themselves and broadcast their messages. But if you stop thinking like a marketer and start thinking like a customer, you’ll understand that the secret to social media is being human – being the sort of person at a cocktail party who listens attentively, tells great stories, shows interest in others, and is authentic and honest.  The secret is to simply be likeable.

Here are 5 tips for small business owners to be more likeable and ensure greater success using social media:

  1. Listen first. Before your first tweet, search Twitter for people talking about your business and your competitors. Search using words that your prospective customers would say as well. For example, if you’re an accountant, use Twitter to search for people tweeting the words “need an accountant” in your town. You’ll be surprised how many people are already looking for you.
  2. Don’t tell your customers to like you and follow you, tell them why and how they should. Everywhere you turn, you see “Like us on Facebook” and “Follow us on Twitter.” Huh? Why? How? Give your customers a reason to connect with you on social networks, answering the question, “What’s in it for me?” and then make it incredibly easy to do so. Note the difference between these two calls to action: “Like my book’s page on Facebook” and “Get answers to all your social media questions at http://FB.com/LikeableBook.
  3. Ask questions. Wondering why nobody’s responding to your posts on Facebook? It’s probably because you’re not asking questions. Social media is about engagement and having a conversation, not about self-promotion. If a pizza place posts on Facebook, “Come on by, 2 pizzas for just $12,” nobody will comment, and nobody will show up. If that same pizza place posts, “What’s your favorite topping?” people will comment online– and then be more likely to show up.
  4. Share pictures and videos. People love photos. The biggest reason Facebook has gone from 0 to 900 million users in 7 years is photos. Photos and videos tell stories about you in ways that text alone cannot. You don’t need a production budget, either. Use your smartphone to take pictures and short videos of customers, staff, and cool things at your business, and then upload them directly to Facebook and Twitter. A picture really is worth a thousand words – and a video is worth a thousand pictures.
  5. Spend at least 30 minutes a day on social media. If you bought a newspaper ad or radio ad, you wouldn’t spend 5 minutes on it or relegate it to interns. Plus, there’s a lot to learn, and every week, new tools and opportunities across social networks emerge. Spend real time each day reading and learning, listening and responding, and truly joining the conversation. The more time and effort you put in to social media, the more benefits your business will receive.

Above all else, follow the golden rule:  Would you yourself click the “Like” button, the Follow button, or Retweet button if you saw your business on Facebook and Twitter? Would you want to be friends with your business at a cocktail party? Just how likeable is your business?

Comments

There are 8 Comments. Add Yours.
  1. How true! Yes, your blog on to be more engaging and to take part in conversation is just the essence of what social media is all about. Thank you for your valuable tips!

  2. Very helpful article. Never really thought about using Social Media to interact with customers like this. I like it!!

  3. Really good article thanks for taking the time to share it. You are so right I am guilty of the marketing piece and need to take a step back. I do get fed up with the constant lke us requests on twitter.

    Will put your ideas into action.

    Tracy

  4. Nice, actionable items. I might be tempted to say ‘Spend NO MORE than 30 minutes a day/at a time’ – to keep it very focused and productive. There’s a lot of distractions and time-pits at every turn. Develop a social media marketing workflow that effectively slices up information gathering, engagement assessment, follower/fan management, answering questions, then sharing specific items that have been prepared in a queue.

  5. Very interesting! I use a personal account and FAN Page’s for business. Is that right? do you think I need account only for business?

    Thanks

  6. The article is very informative and I have found that thinking carefully about your business and the type of audience you are after will help with the selection of social media.

  7. Dave:

    Of the 5 tips you’ve shared here, the one that struck me the most is #2 – give your customers a reason to connect with you. To me, that is the essence to having success with social media. I visit numerous blogs and websites everyday and rarely am I given a reason to connect. All I see are social buttons and the proverbial, “Like us on Facebook.” They have become like banner ads – I don’t even notice them.

    Travis Van Slooten

  8. Great piece of information. Social media can be both beneficial and detrimental to be likeable. I guess the rule of thumb is to use it in the right way. Thanks for posting!

What do you think? Respond.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>